The Nobel Prize is the best thing that

The Nobel Prize is the best thing that can happen to a writer in terms of how it affects your contracts, the publishers, and the seriousness with which your work is taken. On the other hand, it does interfere with your private life, or it can if you let it, and it has zero effect on the writing.It doesn’t help you write better and if you let it, it will intimidate you about future projects.
— Toni Morrison

Writers are decent people, they live quiet, normal

Writers are decent people, they live quiet, normal lives while working to perfect their craft.
They spend their entire lives, dedicated to creating art through words with very little recognition and appreciation.
That artwork immortalizes their thoughts through poetry, short stories and novels, in the form of a book.
That immortalization of thoughts through writing becomes their Legacy.
Long after an Author has departed this world, his stories, his poetry, his novels will live on… As his/her Legacy.
A Legacy for future generations for both, family and potential writers to reflect upon and learn from.

A Legacy built on love, a love for writing. That’s the beauty of writing, That’s why I do what I do.
— Oscar Trejo Jr.

The mind travels faster than the pen; consequently,

The mind travels faster than the pen; consequently, writing becomes a question of learning to make occasional wing shots, bringing down the bird of thought as it flashes by. A writer is a gunner, sometimes waiting in the blind for something to come in, sometimes roaming the countryside hoping to scare something up.
— E.B. White, The Elements of Style

On my website there’s a quote from the

On my website there’s a quote from the writer Anthony Burgess: “The greatest gift is the passion for reading. It is cheap, it consoles, it distracts, it excites, it gives you knowledge of the world and experience of a wide kind.”

I’ve always found that inspiring because the written word, as an art form, is unlike any other: movies, TV, music, they’re shared experiences, but books aren’t like that. The relationship between a writer and a reader is utterly unique to those two individuals. The world that forms in your head as you read a book will be slightly different to that experienced by every other reader. Anywhere. Ever. Reading is very personal, a communication from one mind to another, something which can’t be exactly copied, or replicated, or directly shared.

If I read the work of, say, one of the great Victorian novelists, it’s like a gift from the past, a momentary connection to another’s thoughts. Their ideas are down on paper, to be picked up by me, over a century later. Writers can speak individually to readers across a year, or ten years, or a thousand.

That’s why I love books.
— Simon Cheshire

If you want to concentrate deeply on some

If you want to concentrate deeply on some problem, and especially some piece of writing or paper-work, you should acquire a cat. Alone with the cat in the room where you work … the cat will invariably get up on your desk and settle placidly under the desk lamp … The cat will settle down and be serene, with a serenity that passes all understanding. And the tranquility of the cat will gradually come to affect you, sitting there at your desk, so that all the excitable qualities that impede your concentration compose themselves and give your mind back the self-command it has lost. You need not watch the cat all the time. Its presence alone is enough. The effect of a cat on your concentration is remarkable, very mysterious.
— Muriel Spark, A Far Cry from Kensington